Aerodynamic Faith

Categories: Faith,Racing

Atlanta Motor Speedway Race of ChampionsHave you ever thought about what it really means to believe that God is real, that we were created by Him, and that everything around us was created by Him.

It is a tall order to believe in someone, and live our life for someone, that we cannot place any of our physical senses on.

But that is what we are asked to do when we place our ‘faith’ in God and seek to live in relationship with Him, to devote our life to someone that cannot be proven through sight or touch. After all, that is why it is called Faith. Webster’s dictionary defines faith as a belief or complete trust in something for which there is no proof.

So how do we reconcile that with our minds? How do we find ourselves serving a God that cannot be ‘proven’ by the World’s standards of proof?

I think a lot about the aerodynamics of a race car when I think about our own faith. Race engineers spend countless hours studying the effect of air on a race car. It demands attention, and teams devote large amounts of resources towards studying something that cannot be seen. On the race track, you cannot see the air around the cars, pushing them to the track, creating drag, and working around the cars…however you see the results of the air. And the results demand attention.

While the air is unseen, the results are undeniable. So the ‘faith’ of motor sports aerodynamics centers around something that we only see the effects of. But everyone believes aero is a part of racing.

I think our faith in God works in a similar fashion. When we look at the intricacy of life, the complexity of everything around us…it demands our attention. There must be some unseen power working to make it all work the way it does. Think about our planet, what keeps it from spinning wildly into space ending our existence? What keeps it turning on its axis? I could go on and on about the miracles around us. And when all is said and done, the results demand our attention.

When we really stop to look at how the world works, how life works, how our situations work, we begin to see the effects of something bigger. We recognize something is working out there, and it demands our attention.

A few weeks ago Micah and I were talking about the story of creation versus what the world may try to teach him about creation.

I had to speak in his terms, LEGO’s.

I asked Micah to think about his room, which has tens of thousands of LEGO bricks neatly sorted into drawers and on shelves. I then asked him to imagine a small bomb going off in his room.

I asked him if he thought a small explosion in his room would be able to make an awesome LEGO creation in his floor. He was quick to reply, “OF COURSE NOT!”

I then asked him what the only way that his LEGO creations could come together was, to which he replied, “someone would have to build them.”

Through that, I shared with him the truth that the complexity of creation demands a creator. He got it.

Honestly, it takes more faith to believe ‘it just happened’ than it does to believe God created it.

I love The Message’s version of Hebrews 11:1-4

1-2The fundamental fact of existence is that this trust in God, this faith, is the firm foundation under everything that makes life worth living. It’s our handle on what we can’t see. The act of faith is what distinguished our ancestors, set them above the crowd. 3By faith, we see the world called into existence by God’s word, what we see created by what we don’t see.

I pray that we would constantly be aware of the ‘effects’ around us, drawing us to the reality of God, and His interaction with us every day.

Author: Kyle Froman

Kyle Froman is co-author of "The Race: Living Life on Track" along with Darrell Waltrip and Billy Mauldin. Kyle is a chaplain for Motor Racing Outreach currently serving the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series community. Kyle also serves as the director of the MRO Association, a nationwide network of associate chaplains serving various motor sports communities around the nation. He currently lives in Spring Hill with his bride Michelle, and two boys.